(Beitrag vom Nutzer eingereicht) -------- New version of DNA editing system corrects underlying defects in RNA-based diseases

August 10, 2017



Muscle cells from a patient with myotonic dystrophy type I, untreated (left) and treated with the RNA-targeting Cas9 system (right). The MBNL1 protein is in green, repetitive RNA in red and the cell's nucleus in blue. MBNL1 is an important RNA-binding protein and its normal function is disrupted when it binds repetitive RNA. In the treated cells on the right, MBNL1 is released from the repetitive RNA. Credit: UC San Diego Health
Until recently, the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique could only be used to manipulate DNA. In a 2016 study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers repurposed the technique to track RNA in live cells in a method called RNA-targeting Cas9 (RCas9). In a new study, published August 10 in Cell, the team takes RCas9 a step further: they use the technique to correct molecular mistakes that lead to microsatellite repeat expansion diseases, which include myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2, the most common form of hereditary ALS, and Huntington's disease.

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https://phys.org/news/2017-08-version-dna-underlying-defects-rna-based.amp