(Contribution submitted by the user) -------- The number beds a good choice for the facet joint syndrome

(Beitrag vom Nutzer eingereicht) -------- Hypothalamic Stem Cells Regulate Aging Speed Stem cells in the brain’s hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The finding, made in mice, could lead to new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan. The hypothalamus was known to regulate important processes including growth, development, reproduction and metabolism. In a 2013 study, Einstein researchers made the surprising finding that the hypothalamus also regulates aging throughout the body. Now, the scientists have pinpointed the cells in the hypothalamus that control aging: a tiny population of adult neural stem cells, which were known to be responsible for forming new brain neurons. “Our research shows that the number of hypothalamic neural stem cells naturally declines over the life of the animal, and this decline accelerates aging. But we also found that the effects of this loss are not irreversible. By replenishing these stem cells or the molecules they produce, it’s possible to slow and even reverse various aspects of aging throughout the body,” says senior author Dongsheng Cai, M.D., Ph.D., professor of molecular pharmacology at Einstein. *** http://reliawire.com/hypothalamic-stem-cells-aging/?

(Beitrag vom Nutzer eingereicht) -------- New version of DNA editing system corrects underlying defects in RNA-based diseases

August 10, 2017



Muscle cells from a patient with myotonic dystrophy type I, untreated (left) and treated with the RNA-targeting Cas9 system (right). The MBNL1 protein is in green, repetitive RNA in red and the cell's nucleus in blue. MBNL1 is an important RNA-binding protein and its normal function is disrupted when it binds repetitive RNA. In the treated cells on the right, MBNL1 is released from the repetitive RNA. Credit: UC San Diego Health
Until recently, the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique could only be used to manipulate DNA. In a 2016 study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers repurposed the technique to track RNA in live cells in a method called RNA-targeting Cas9 (RCas9). In a new study, published August 10 in Cell, the team takes RCas9 a step further: they use the technique to correct molecular mistakes that lead to microsatellite repeat expansion diseases, which include myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2, the most common form of hereditary ALS, and Huntington's disease.

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https://phys.org/news/2017-08-version-dna-underlying-defects-rna-based.amp